Immerse yourself in the world of Darjeeling teas - quality you can taste!

Preparation & Storage of Darjeeling Tea

During preparation, about ten to twelve grams of tea leaves are added to one litre of water. This depends on the particular variety and also on personal preferences. Two grams, or about one teaspoon, is enough for one cup. The ideal temperature is 95 degrees Celsius, as this allows the ingredients to unfold and the flavour to develop. It also makes sense to rinse the pot or cup with hot water so that the tea does not get cold too quickly. Unlike green tea, black tea cannot be brewed several times.

The brewing time should not exceed five minutes; three minutes is ideal. If you wait longer, you will have to put up with an increasingly bitter taste, which is due to the tannins contained in the tea, and the caffeine content also increases immensely with longer infusion. A shorter brewing time, on the other hand, has a positive effect on digestion. The preparation in brief:

  • 1 litre of water with 10-12g tea leaves
  • 95 degree water is ideal
  • for First Flush 2–3 minutes and 3–4 minutes for Second Flush. 

Black tea is stored like other varieties. Light and moisture are particularly hard on it, which is why opaque packaging makes sense and it should always be stored in a cupboard. Then the substances contained and the strong aroma are preserved in the long term and enjoyment is always guaranteed.

Did you know?

In the north-east of India, on the border with Nepal, Sikkim and Bhutan, we find the tea gardens of the Darjeeling district. The best of them are located at an altitude of over 1,500 metres. These teas are among the finest in the world. The high altitude, the harsh climate and the soil conditions allow the plants to grow longer than in lower altitudes and give the tea a fine, nuanced aroma. Each planting period has its own distinctive flavour: the spring planting (first flush) produces delicate, highly aromatic teas, the summer planting (second flush) stronger and the autumn planting (autumnal) teas with less tannin. The so-called „Inbetween” (harvest between mid-April and mid-May) lie between the First and Second Flush harvests in terms of taste. The precious and sought-after Darjeeling teas have a light infusion. Their taste depends on the season. They are highly aromatic and flowery and must not be steeped for too long.  

Darjeeling tea: from plantation to cup – A journey through the origins of tea enjoyment

Darjeeling tea - an exquisite treat from the mountains of India. But what makes this tea so special? In our article you will learn everything about the growing areas and the cultivation of Darjeeling tea, the different varieties and how to prepare it best. You will be surprised at the explosion of flavours this tea can create and how easy it is to enjoy. Let yourself be enchanted by the world of Darjeeling tea and discover a new way of enjoying tea! By the end, you will not only be an expert on Darjeeling tea, but you will also have a nice anecdote about the subject at hand.

Welcome to a journey about the delicious Darjeeling tea! In this chapter we will tell you a lot about this unique tea from the Darjeeling region of India. Learn more about the history, production and preparation of this noble tea and let yourself be enchanted by its diverse aromas. We invite you to join us on a journey through the world of Darjeeling tea and discover it in all its beauty. Let us dive into the fascinating world of Darjeeling tea together!

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Table of contents

Introduction
  1. Brief introduction to Darjeeling tea
  2. Why Darjeeling tea is a special drink
History of Darjeeling tea
  1. The discovery of Darjeeling tea
  2. How Darjeeling tea became one of the most famous teas in the world
Growing areas and cultivation of Darjeeling tea
  1. The Darjeeling region and its special climatic conditions
  2. How Darjeeling tea is grown and harvested
Varieties of Darjeeling tea
  1. First Flush, Second Flush and Autumnal Flush – What does it mean?
  2. Differences between the different varieties of Darjeeling tea
Preparation of Darjeeling tea
  1. The right water temperature and brewing time
  2. How to best enjoy Darjeeling tea
Conclusion

Introduction

Brief introduction to Darjeeling tea

Darjeeling tea is a high quality and aromatic tea that comes from the mountains of north-eastern India. The Darjeeling region is located in West Bengal and is known for its gentle hills, fertile forests and mild climate - ideal conditions for growing tea. Darjeeling tea is often called the champagne of teas and is considered one of the best teas in the world. It is characterised by its flowery taste and its fine aroma, which is created by the altitude and the careful processing of the tea. Darjeeling tea is drunk pure or with milk or lemon and is perfect for a relaxing afternoon or evening break.

Why Darjeeling tea is a special drink

Darjeeling tea is a special drink that comes from the mountains of the Himalayas. The region in the north-east of India is known for its excellent tea plants and the unique climatic conditions that make it possible to produce one of the best teas in the world. The taste of Darjeeling tea is delicate and floral with hints of nutmeg and cinnamon. Darjeeling tea is usually drunk without milk or sugar to bring out its natural flavours. It is no wonder that this tea is very popular with tea lovers all over the world and is considered one of the finest beverages one can enjoy.

History of Darjeeling tea

The discovery of Darjeeling tea

There are several legends üabout the discovery of Darjeeling tea. One of the most famous is that in 1826, while on an expedition in the hills of Darjeeling, a British official named Arthur Campbell came across a group of locals who were gathering leaves from wild tea bushes and making them into a refreshing drink. Fascinated by the taste and quality of the tea, Campbell took some samples to Calcutta, where it quickly became the British's favourite drink. Another legend says that in 1835, a Nepalese prince named Bodhi Thamphu came across a wild tea plant during a hunting expedition in the mountains of Darjeeling and decided to cultivate it. He sent some plants to his brother in Kathmandu, who in turn passed them on to an English trader. He recognised the potential of the tea and began to export it. Regardless of which story is true, Darjeeling tea is today considered one of the best and most expensive teas in the world.

How Darjeeling tea became one of the most famous teas in the world

Darjeeling tea has become one of the most famous teas in the world because it comes from a region known for its unique combination of climate, soil and altitude. The tea plantations in the hills of Darjeeling in north-eastern India produce a tea with a distinctive aroma and flavour that has been called the “champagne of teas”.

In addition, British colonial rule in India helped Darjeeling tea to become known worldwide. During this time, Darjeeling tea was considered an exclusive and luxurious tea and was very popular among the wealthy British. Today, Darjeeling tea is appreciated and sought after by tea lovers around the world for its quality and unique taste.

Growing areas and cultivation of Darjeeling tea

 

The Darjeeling region and its special climatic conditions

The Darjeeling region, located in the north-east of India, is known for its unique climatic conditions. It lies at an altitude of 2,000 metres above sea level and is surrounded by the majestic Himalayan mountains. The climate in Darjeeling is subtropical with humid monsoons. During the summer months from April to June it can get very hot, but temperatures drop during the monsoon in July and August. Autumn (September to November) is one of the best seasons to visit Darjeeling as the weather is mild and pleasant. Darjeeling is also known for its famous tea cultivation. The climatic conditions in this region are ideal for growing tea leaves. The area receives sufficient rainfall and the temperature remains moderate throughout the year, which contributes to the development of a unique taste. Another feature of the Darjeeling region is its numerous national parks and wildlife reserves. These areas offer a plethora of flora and fauna, including rare species such as the red panda and the snow leopard.

Overall, the Darjeeling region offers breathtaking scenery and abundant wildlife due to its unique climatic conditions, as well as world-famous tea cultivation. So it is definitely worth exploring this fascinating region!

How Darjeeling tea is grown and harvested

Darjeeling tea is grown in the mountains in the northern part of India, particularly in the Darjeeling region in the state of West Bengal. The plants are grown on terraces or steep slopes and require special conditions such as an altitude between 600 and 2000 metres, a humid climate and fertile soil. Darjeeling tea is usually harvested from March to November in several passes, with only the tender leaf buds and the first two leaves being picked. This is done by hand to ensure that only the best parts of the plant are harvested. After planting, the leaves are immediately processed to preserve their freshness and improve their flavour. The process varies according to the type of tea (black, green or white) and also affects the taste of the finished tea.

Varieties of Darjeeling tea

First Flush, Second Flush, Inbeetween and Autumnal Flush

What does it mean?
  • First Flush Darjeeling: First Flush Darjeeling tea is a high quality variety of black tea made from the first fresh leaves of tea plants in the Darjeeling region of north-eastern India. These tea leaves are harvested in spring and have a fine taste with floral and fruity notes as well as a light sweetness.
  • Second Flush Darjeeling: Second Flush Darjeeling tea is a special variety of black tea made from the leaves of the Camellia sinensis tea plant. The name Second Flush refers to the second harvest time of the year (June to July) when the tea leaves are harvested. The taste of second flush Darjeeling tea is known for its strong aromas and notes of nutmeg, caramel and fruit. The colour of the tea varies from golden brown to dark red, depending on the production process.
  • Inbetween Darjeeling: Inbetween Darjeeling tea is a special tea from the Darjeeling region in India. It is harvested between the main spring and summer harvests and is characterised by a special blend of flavours from the two main harvests. Inbetween Darjeeling tea has a mild, floral flavour with a hint of nutmeg and is often considered to be the “in-betweenöheck” between the two main harvests.
  • Autumnal Flush Darjeeling: Autumnal Flush Darjeeling is a type of tea harvested in autumn in the Darjeeling region of India. It differs from other Darjeeling teas by its richer flavour and darker colour due to the higher tannin content. The tea also has a slightly spicy character and is often described as crisp and full-bodied.

Differences between the different varieties of Darjeeling tea

There are several varieties of Darjeeling tea´s that differ in taste and aroma. Here are some of the differences:
  • First Flush: This variety is harvested from the first leaves of spring and has a delicate aroma with a hint of flowers.
  • Second Flush: This variety is obtained from the later harvests in summer and has a stronger flavour with a fruity note.
  • Autumnal Flush: This variety is harvested in autumn and has a stronger flavour with a hint of nuts or spices.
  • Clonal: This variety is made from a particular strain of tea plant and has an intense flavour with notes of nutmeg or cinnamon.
  • Organic: This variety is grown without the use of pesticides or chemical fertilisers and often has a natural sweetness as well as a smooth texture.

The choice depends on personal taste, but many people prefer the First Flush for its subtle aroma, while others prefer the Second Flush as it is a little stronger. 

Preparation of Darjeeling tea

The right water temperature and brewing time

Here are some general tips for making Darjeeling tea:
  1. Use fresh water and bring it to a boil
  2. Let the water cool to a temperature of 85-90°C before brewing the tea.
  3. Place one teaspoon of Darjeeling tea in a cup or tea kettle.
  4. Pour the hot water over the tea and allow it to steep for 2-3 minutes.
  5. Remove the tea leaves with a tea strainer and enjoy your Darjeeling tea.

It is important to note that the exact amount of tea and brewing time may vary according to personal taste. Some people prefer their Darjeeling tea stronger or stronger than others. Experiment a little to find out what works best for you!

How to enjoy Darjeeling tea

Here are some ways to enjoy Darjeeling tea:

  • Brew with hot water: Brew the tea with hot water and let it steep for 2-3 minutes. Enjoy the tea pure or with milk and sugar.
  • As iced tea: let the tea cool and add ice cubes. Add lemon juice, mint or other fruit to taste.
  • With a snack: Accompany your Darjeeling tea with a small snack such as biscuits or biscuits.
  • In a tea party: invite friends and serve Darjeeling tea in a beautiful teapot along with delicious snacks and biscuits.
  • At sunrise or sunset: Enjoy a cup of Darjeeling tea with spectacular views during sunrise or sunset.

Conclusion

Darjeeling tea is a special kind of tea, which many call the champagne of teas because of its unique taste and aroma. The tea is grown and harvested exclusively in the mountains of Darjeeling in north-eastern India. The terroir, climate and altitude all contribute to the tea's distinctive character. Darjeeling tea is known for its floral and fruity notes as well as its mild taste. There are different varieties of Darjeeling tea, depending on the time of harvest and where it is grown. However, each Darjeeling tea has a certain elegance and sophistication that makes it a must for every tea lover.

Customer service

If you have any questions about our Darjeeling teas, need more information about the sales process, or want to give us feedback, one of our staff will be happy to help.


Service hotline: 0172/ 9149105.

E-mail: info@lerbs-hagedorn.de

 

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